Category Archives: St. George Area

St. George Catholic Church

St. George, Utah Catholic Church, Click for Home Page

St. George, Utah Catholic Church, Click for Home Page

The St. George Catholic Church is located at 259 West 200 North, St. George Utah 84770  only three blocks away from Best Western Coral Hills.  Office: 435-673-2604, Rectory: 435-673-7354.  See below for a history of the Southern Utah Catholic congregation.

Click HERE for Mass times.

Click HERE for Mass times.

 

From the Washington County Historical Society:
In 1879, Father Lawrence Scanlan  established the St. John’s Catholic Church,  the Silver Reef Hospital,  and St. Mary’s School in Silver Reef.  At the invitation of his friend, John MacFarlane, a deputy U.S. mineral surveyor at Silver Reef,  Father Scanlan offered mass in the newly completed St. George Tabernacle.  The St. George Tabernacle choir sang and three thousand people attended the mass.  This was the first high mass celebrated in southern Utah.
In 1951, Bishop Hunt of the Salt Lake City Diocese of the Catholic Church purchased the old   Presbyterian Church and property.  For several years, the small chapel in this structure was used for mass.
The historic building was remodeled in 1958 to serve as a church with an adjoining rectory.  It was dedicated by Bishop Federal on June 8, 1958.
The St. George Parish was formally established in 1958.  It was administered jointly with Christ the King Parish in Cedar City,  since neither parish was large enough to accommodate a full-time priest.  Though there was only one resident Catholic family in St. George in 1958,  the church there served the needs of the influx of tourists during summer months.  They also cared to missions in Enterprise and Zion National Park.
In the 1970s, fifteen Catholic families were registered  at the church/rectory duplex on Main Street in St. George.  The resident pastor of Cedar City provided pastoral care throughout Washington County.
In 1979, under the supervision of John Lanham of Dammeron Valley,  the church was renovated and expanded to double the seating capacity.  Local residents paid the cost by raising $25,000,  and the Catholic Church Extension Society also assisted the project.
In 1981, landscaping was completed and an addition was made to the rectory  by contractors Jim Martin and Sal Grillo.
Also in 1981, two Holy Cross Sisters served as pastoral associates  to the five parishes in the Southwestern Deanery  of the Salt Lake Diocese and visited St. George regularly.
The St. George Parish received its first full-time priest in 1983.  Father James M. Greenwell (administrator of the parish from late 1980 to 1983)  served as the first full-time pastor during the year 1983.  He was also administrator of St. Christopher Parish in Kanab  during that year until Father Anthony Vollmer CPpS was named pastor there.
The Father Paul S. Kuzy CPpS became pastor in 1984.  At this time, there were 150 Catholic families and well over 250 members.  He also served Zion National Park as a station of the St. George Parish,   offering mass in the lodge there weekly from May through September.  During this time, a parish council was formed, a Newman Club  was started at Dixie College, and a parish thrift shop was opened.  Father Kuzy served until his death in the spring of 1997.
The old church building was torn down in 1990.  A new and larger white stucco Spanish-style building was constructed on the site in 1991.  That building with attached hall and offices was dedicated July 14, 1991 by Bishop Weigand.
A new social hall was dedicated December 14, 1995 by Bishop Niederauer,  and later named Kuzy Hall for the beloved pastor who died in 1997.  The church was then expanded to include the section previously used as a parish hall.
In 1998, the Metcalf property was purchased as a rectory.  The old rectory was demolished in 2003 and in 2005 the recently purchased rectory was renovated.
On March 13, 2005, Bishop Niederauer dedicated the new Bishop Scanlan Catholic Center,  which housed a large thrift store, parish classrooms, and offices.  Surrounding homes had been purchase to provide space for the expansion and required parking.
The present parish in St. George serves some 1,800 families  and also gathers people in Hurricane for mass, prayer, and socializing.
The future:
During the 1990s, with the assistance of benefactors as well as the Diocesan Development Drive,  the diocese purchased property at Washington City on the east side of St. George for a future church.  They also acquired ten acres in Hurricane, where the local Catholics have organized a thrift store  to begin raising funds for a church there at some future date.  In 2007 the diocese purchased property in the areas of Southgate and Ivins.

Parade of Homes, St. George 2014 – 2 Free Tickets!!

St. George Area Parade of Homes between February 14 and 23rd

Are you planning on going to the St. George Area Parade of Homes ?
“Like” this post and our page on Facebook and be entered to WIN 2 Tickets to St. George Parade of Homes.
Comment what you like about your house and double your chances!
The winner will be picked at random and will be announced this Friday, February 14, 2014 at 10:00am when the parade begins.
A chance to win two free tickets: like our post and page on Facebook.

A chance to win two free tickets: like our post and page on Facebook.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The St. George Area Parade of Homes is presented by the Southern Utah Home Builders Association (SUHBA). SUHBA is a trade association representing building industry businesses throughout Washington, Kane and San Juan Counties of Southern Utah. Our members play a vital role in the construction industry. Our mission is to build communities. Our tools are education, communication, participation and advocacy.

Homes are open daily from 10 am to 7 pm throughout Washington County, Utah (closes at 5 pm on February 23rd).  Plan to attend and see why the St. George Area Parade of Homes is one of the most popular Parades in the country – over 28,600 people attended last year! For more information, contact the Southern Utah Home Builders Association at 435-674-1400.

Best Western does not endorse, sponsor, or administer this promotion. This promotion is in no way sponsored, endorsed or administered by, or associated with, Facebook. By participating, you hereby release and hold harmless Facebook from any and all liability associated with this promotion.

“Dixie” How St. George got the Nickname

When you come to visit southern Utah, and specifically St. George, you will notice two predominant features on the surrounding hills.  The first is a very large “D” lit up on the Black Hill and a “DIXIE” painted on the sugar loaf or the Red Hill.  Obviously, the “D” stands for Dixie; but why?

How does "Dixie" fit in to St. George?

How does “Dixie” fit in to St. George?

Here’s how the story goes…

When the Mormon (Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints) Pioneers left the United States to go out west and settled what is now Salt Lake City they the began to establish settlements about every fifty miles to the north, south, east and west.  The reason it was every fifty miles is because that was about how long the signal on a telegraph wire would extend.  This expansion of what was then called the Territory of Deseret is most notable when looking at a map and the settlements that extend north into Canada and as far south into Mexico.  In fact it is interesting to note that the cities of Mesquite and Las Vegas, Nevada were created due to this expansion effort.

Geographically there is a mountain range between St. George and Cedar City, Utah…fifty miles north.  This is the reason for the drastic difference in weather between northern Utah, which has great snow skiing, and southern Utah which has great golf – year-round.

The warmer weather alone still doesn’t account for the nickname “Dixie”.

When the American Civil War broke out it became extremely expensive to find cotton and have it shipped to the western territories.  Thought the Mormons did not actively participate in the Civil War fighting they claimed faithfulness to the Union and had strong antislavery sentiments.  To find remedy to this lack of cotton several of the Mormon Saints were sent to establish the Cotton Mission.  They were charged to grow cotton and other warm climate crops.  Today one can still tour the Historic Cotton Mill which currently houses the Star Nursery Business.   Some of those Saints were from the southern United States and had the special skills and knowledge in growing cotton.

Other products that are known to come out of the area included Dixie Wine, silk and tobacco.   Grapes grow well in the area and one will notice Mulberry trees that abound in the historic areas of Downtown St. George.  The leaves from these trees was harvested to feed to the silk worms.

So, for the warmer climate, the growing of cotton by some Southern Saints, the area  became known as Dixie, and later Utah’s Dixie.

Since 1998, Star Nursery has owned the historic Cotton Mill Factory in Washington City, Utah. For many years during the 19th century, the factory was at the center of cotton production in Washington County. (Photo by Loren Webb)

Since 1998, Star Nursery has owned the historic Cotton Mill Factory in Washington City, Utah. For many years during the 19th century, the factory was at the center of cotton production in Washington County. (Photo by Loren Webb)

Snow Records for St. George, Utah, 3rd highest on record.

Snow Records, here are the top four snow days:

The 1-day snowfall records for St. George are:
1st 1894 15”
2nd 1974 10”
3rd 1919 8” the next day received another 8” for a total of 16”
3rd 2013 8”
All over St. George there are scenes occurring which are not often seen.  First, the more obvious, there is white stuff all over everything.  After some research it was determined that indeed it was snow….and staying.  This conclusion was reached due to the freezing air temperature, cars sliding on the road, children sledding down hillsides and a multiplicity of what looks to be snowmen and snow forts doting the city.  Even ice cycles have appeared overnight.

There can be a snowfall about once, maybe twice, a year and typically it is gone within hours or by the end of the next day.  It certainly is a pretty site however when viewed from atop any of the area hillsides.

Check this link for more information and stories regarding the snow from St. George News.

Photo Credit/Shawn Ferris

Record snowfall of 8" in December 2013 ties for third place.

Record snowfall of 8″ in December 2013 ties for third place.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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“Messiah” performance free to attend

Handel’s “Messiah” will be performed 7:30 p.m. Dec. 1 and 2 at the Cox, 350 S. 700 East, St. George. Admission to the concert is free, and attendees are encouraged to arrive early, as there are no reserved seats.

Locally, this year marks the 33rd performance of “Messiah” by the Southwest Symphony and Chorale with the Community Chorus in St. George. The choir and soloists are rehearsed and prepared by Robert Briggs and the concert is directed by Gary Caldwell.

The Southwest Symphony Orchestra and Chorale perform Handel's "Messiah"

The Southwest Symphony Orchestra and Chorale perform Handel’s “Messiah”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The music for Messiah was completed in 24 days of swift composition. The autograph score’s 259 pages show some signs of haste such as blots, scratchings-out, unfilled bars and other uncorrected errors, but according to the music scholar Richard Luckett the number of errors is remarkably small in a document of this length.

In the Christian tradition, the figure of the “Messiah” or redeemer is identified with the person of Jesus, known by his followers as the Christ or “Jesus Christ”. Handel’s Messiah has been described by the early-music scholar Richard Luckett as “a commentary on [Jesus Christ’s] Nativity, Passion, Resurrection and Ascension”, beginning with God’s promises as spoken by the prophets and ending with Christ’s glorification in heaven.[ In contrast with most of Handel’s oratorios, the singers in Messiah do not assume dramatic roles, there is no single, dominant narrative voice, and very little use is made of quoted speech. In his libretto, Jennens’s intention was not to dramatise the life and teachings of Jesus, but to acclaim the “Mystery of Godliness”, using a compilation of extracts from the Authorized (King James) Version of the Bible, and from the Psalms included with the Book of Common Prayer (which are worded slightly differently from their King James counterparts).

The three-part structure of the work approximates to that of Handel’s three-act operas, with the “parts” subdivided by Jennens into “scenes”. Each scene is a collection of individual numbers or “movements” which take the form of recitatives, arias and choruses.  There are two instrumental numbers, the opening Sinfony in the style of a French overture, and the pastoral Pifa, often called the “pastoral symphony”, at the mid-point of Part I.

In Part I, the Messiah’s coming and the Virgin Birth are predicted by the Old Testament prophets. The annunciation to the shepherds of the birth of the Christ is represented in the words of St Luke’s Gospel. Part II covers Christ’s Passion and his death, his Resurrection and Ascension, the first spreading of the Gospel through the world, and a definitive statement of God’s glory summarised in the “Hallelujah”. Part III begins with the promise of Redemption, followed by a prediction of the Day of Judgment and the “general Resurrection”, ending with the final victory over sin and death and the acclamation of Christ. According to the musicologist Donald Burrows, much of the text is so allusive as to be largely incomprehensible to those ignorant of the biblical accounts. For the benefit of his audiences, Jennens printed and issued a pamphlet explaining the reasons for his choices of scriptural selections.

Museums in St. George, Utah

Museums continue to pop up all around St. George.

Museums in the area abound with history, education, natural wonders and art in St. Goerge.  Here is a list with links and descriptions to many in the area. The list below each contains a hyperlink to its respective site, and the approximate distance from BEST WESTERN Coral Hills.

  1. Daughters of the Utah Pioneers Museum – 0 blocks,  FREE to the public, area artifacts and stories
  2. St. George Art Museum – 2 blocks, Minimal cost, well operated and very relaxing
  3. St. George Children’s Museum – 3 blocks, the Newest addition to a great collection, well worth a visit especially for young children with a lot of energy.  Many hands on exhibits.
  4. Dixie State University Sears Art Gallery – 7 blocks, A great rotating gallery of art and history exhibits, minimal cost if any 
  5. Rosenbruch Wildlife Museum – 2 miles, full body game animal mounts from across the globe and a vast collection of insects for your young entomologist (study of insects)
  6. Washington City Museum – 3 miles, Pioneer era artifacts
  7. Dinosaur Tracks at Johnsons Farm – 3 miles, showcases footprints of a kind raptor only known to exist in this area 
  8. Samuel R. Knight Santa Clara History Museum – 5 miles, in the basement of the city offices.
  9. Western Sky Aviation Warbird Museum – 6 miles, a great collection of full and operational war planes.
  10. Hurricane Pioneer Museum – 16 miles, local pioneer artifacts
  11. Wells Fargo Silver Reef Museum – 10 miles, well operated, artifacts, restored buildings  of an old mining ghost towm
  12. Pilot Peak DUP Museum – Enterprise, Utah, local pioneer artifacts
  13. Zion Human History Museum – 42 miles, natural history
St. George Art Museum

St. George Art Museum

 

For a comprehensive list with addresses and phone numbers for area museums in and near  Washington County click here.

If we were to add another  the next should be a location for a film and movies showcasing the development of the film industry and the many movies made in the Southern Utah area.  Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, a multiple of John Wayne westerns, and SciFi movies such as Galaxy Quest and others. Much of the feature film The Fly Boys was filmed in St. George proper just blocks away from the Best Western Coral Hills property.

 

Pickellball Courts!

Pickleball continues to grow in popularity and access.

Act like a true local and hit the Pickleball  courts in St. George. The fast-paced game is a cross of whiffle ball and  badminton and great for the old and young.

Watch a demonstration of the game on the USA  Pickleball Association’s website, pick up some equipment and get outside.

Pickleball Courts in St. George, Utah

Pickleball Courts in St. George, Utah

We have several courts in the St. George area with the closest to Best Western Coral Hills only four blocks away at the Vernon Worthen Park.

The sport is played on a court with the same dimensions as a doubles badminton court. The net is similar to a tennis net, but is mounted two inches lower. The game is played with a hard paddle and a polymer smaller version of a wiffle ball.

Pickleball is similar to tennis, but with differences. A pickleball ball typically moves at one-third of the average speed of a tennis ball and the court is just under one-third of the total area of a tennis court.

Pickleball Courts in St. George, Utah

Pickleball Courts in St. George, Utah

 

National Park Closures

2013-09-12 18.47.21

Highway 9 through Zion National Park is still open

National Park Closures

DON’T PANIC and don’t cancel your plans!  There is still a lot to do and see in southern Utah.  INCLUDING seeing a portion of Zion and Bryce National Parks

Yes, it is true National Parks across the country are officially closed.  However, talk to the locals and you will find there are well traveled locations to overlook into the parks that are still viewable for the general public.

There is still A LOT to do and see in southern Utah!

 

ZION NATIONAL PARK:  Highway 9 through ZION NATIONAL PARK is still open which provides views to many of the popular park features including the mile long tunnel and Checkerboard Mesa.  Also open is the giant screen movie Treasure of the Gods which presents grand views of Zion’s not readily accessible from the general areas.

CEDAR BREAKS, is the road through Cedar Breaks, also open and the views are accessible, but all buildings will be closed and unmanned.

SNOW CANYON STATE PARK, 20 minutes outside of St George, is a great spot to visit as well.

BYRCE CANYON NATIONL PARK: Best Western Ruby’s Inn offers a private shuttle and viewing location into Bryce Canyon.  Southern Utah also has several historic sites, and ghost towns worth checking out.

We recommend calling a Best Western close to each National Park to find out what additional attractions there are to visit in each area.  There are known outlooks that give access into the parks.  Those still make a trip worthwhile.

SNOW CANYON STATE PARK, St. George, BW Coral Hills 800-542-7733

ZION NP: BW Zion Park Inn 800-934-7275

BRYCE NP: BW RUBY’S INN: 435-834-5341, BW PLUS Grand Hotel: 435-834-5700

CEDAR BREAKS: BW El Rey Inn & Suites: 435-586-6518, BW Town & Country 435-586-9900

Rappelling in Southern Utah

 

Rappelling in Southern Utah

Rappelling in Southern Utah

Rappelling in Southern Utah and St. George is alive and well with a multitude of locations to choose from.

rap·pel

/ræˈpɛl, rə-/ Show Spelled [ra-pel, ruh-] Show IPA noun, verb, rap·pelled, rap·pel·ling.

noun

1.  (in mountaineering) the act or method of moving down a steep incline or past an overhang by means of a double rope secured above and placed around the body, usually under the left thigh and over the right shoulder, and paid out gradually in the descent.

verb (used without object)

2.  to descend by means of a rappel.

Origin:
1930–35; < French:  mountaineering term, literally, a recall.

 

 

Here are some videos demonstrating rappelling.

Some great, popular spots for repelling are:
Zion National Park
Snow Canyon State Park
Dixie Rock (above the city)
Virgin River Gorge
• Kolob Plateau


 


 

 

Visitors Information for St. George, Utah

Visitors Information for St. George, Utah is readily available at the front desk of Best Western Coral Hills or at the St. George Chamber of Commerce located two doors away.

FREE maps of the Downtown, Historic District are available at either location.

The Chamber of Commerce/Visitors Center is open Monday through Friday from 9:00 am till 5:00 pm.

Old County Courthouse in St. George, Utah. Courtesy Calvin Beale

Visitors Information inside the Old County Courthouse in St. George, Utah. Courtesy Calvin Beale

On interesting bits of history regarding the courthouse:

Legend has it that the domed cupola on the Pioneer Courthouse in St. George was designed specifically for hangings, although it never was used for that gruesome purpose.

But that’s not to say the county never had a hanging. 

Douglas Alder, a past president of the Washington County Historical Society and Dixie State University, said that in about 1875, a miner working north of St. George in Silver Reef was accused of killing a fellow miner. The alleged killer was arrested and jailed in the basement of the courthouse. But he wasn’t there long. Shortly after he was put in the jail, a group of the murder victim’s friends descended on the courthouse, broke out the prisoner and hung him from a nearby tree.

A common case that was heard within the walls of its upstairs courtroom in the late 19th century was theft charges against ranchers and farmers accused of releasing irrigation water too early, Alder said. Today, visitors to the historic building can watch a re-enactment of a water theft trial.

“We always find them guilty,” said Alder.

Alder tells another story about Will Brooks, a county sheriff in the early 19th century who was responsible for feeding the inmates. Alder said Brooks sometimes ignored jail procedure and took the prisoners home with him for a meal.

The basement jail space is now used for storage, while the Chamber of Commerce occupies the main floor. The former courtroom on the top floor is now used for lectures.